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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
. nadia bilchik joins me again. nadia, for this week's segment you had an opportunity to speak with a woman with kati marton about her book. she was married to peter jennings and the late ambassador peter holbrooke. i asked her why now is the time to write her memoir. >> i wanted to make something permanent out of what turned out to be impermanent, that is my 17 years with richard, my husband who died entirely unexpectedly in the middle of life. and in the days after his death, i couldn't sleep, so i started keeping a journal. and that really was the genesis of this book. and then it kind of took own a life of its own. but i don't think it's worth writing a memoir without being honest. >> you were married to peter jennings and news correspondent and now an author. >> this is by no mean as tell-all book. it's very honest, as honest as i could make it. there tees nothing in there that isn't honest but i chose themes that i thought would be universal. human themes. okay, it's my life, my story, but, in fact, it's really about the human condition. and although it was triggered by t
and spoke exclusively to cnn's nadia bilchik. >> reporter: over the last few weeks the entire world has been monitoring the treatment of your grandfather, nelson mandela, and he was released from hospital on wednesday. i know the two of you saw him this week. could you describe his condition? >> we're just so happy that our grandfather is home after his hospital stay. he's doing extremely well. he's surrounded by the family. we actually just left this afternoon. we just saw him this afternoon with the kids, and he was happy to see the kids. so he's really, really been taken care of very, very well. very, very well. and we'd just like to thank the whole world for sending us messages and keeping us in their prayers. we're just so happy and happy that he's home. he's doing extremely well. >> you said he was playing with the kids? he's actually sitting up? is he walking? >> he's sitting up, but he was waving at the kids and smiling at the kids. he's very alert. and he's very aware what's going on. so, yeah. he's doing extremely well. extremely well. >> you know, there have been so many speculati
era in venezuela. joining us now is our nadia bilchik. great to talk to you. so does this mean he's really afraid? what does this mean that now he's naming a successor? >> well, now we know he has to have very serious surgery. it's cancer in the pelvic area. he hesam been specific as to exactly where. we know there are mag lig nanlt tumors that have been removed. he says if something were to happen to incapacitate me, nicolas maduro would replace me. he's the vice president, and a friend. >> it sounds like he's saying it out loud. why cuba for the surgery? >> that's interesting. he was deciding between a hospital in brazil. he chose cuba. is it for the privacy of being there or the oncologists, but we do know that is his hospital of choice and it's not unusual for a president to go outside of his country. for example, the former president of paraguay was ill, he went to brazil, for privacy and probably the best oncologists he knows. >> and, nadia, he's been critical. do most people feel that way? >> very divided between the va vistas and the opposition, but what we know is he's ve
something themselves. >> and that was nadia bilchik with that exclusive interview. >>> you know you love your kids, you called to check on them, want to make sure they're okay. even at school, though? >> one young woman says her parents went way too far, took them to court. we'll have her story next. but you're progressive, and they're them. yes. but they're here. yes. are you...? there? yes. no. are you them? i'm me. but those rates are for... them. so them are here. yes! you want to run through it again? no, i'm good. you got it? yes. rates for us and them -- now that's progressive. call or click today. ♪ you make me happy when skies are gray ♪ [ female announcer ] you know exactly what it takes to make them feel better. ♪ you make me happy [ female announcer ] that's why you choose children's tylenol. the same brand your mom trusted for you when you were young. ♪ how much i love you [ humming ] [ female announcer ] children's tylenol, the #1 brand of pain and fever relief recommended by pediatricians and used by moms decade after decade. [ humming ] >>> okay. so i want
family dynamics that are becoming the new normal for, well, the modern family. cnn's nadia bilchik sat down with danny zucker, the show's executive producer. >> it's hard to know what makes it such a phenomenon but i think it's that it's relatable to a wide swath of the audience from my children's -- their friends watch the show, and their parents watch the show. and someone described it as -- a friend described it as kind of like a camp fire. there hadn't been anything like that on the air for a while that everybody sort of watched together. and i -- i think it was an antidote to snarky television for a while. >> how do you find ininspiration for some of the jokes? >> the stories come right from my family. something will happen in my family, and my kids will watch me go for my phone to write notes and be like, don't put that in the show. and all of the writers on the show have this with our family because we purge -- i mean, we have just told -- we have dug from the depths of our family all of our -- skeletons in our closet. you know, we need stories, and that comes first. we did an e
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)